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Social relation - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/social_relation
In social science, a social relation or social interaction is any relationship between two or more individuals. Social relations derived from individual agency form the basis of social structure and the basic object for analysis by social scientists. Fundamental inquiries into the nature of social relations feature in the work of ...
Outline of relationships - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/outline_of_relationships
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to interpersonal relationships. Interpersonal relationship – association between two or more people; this association may be based on limerence, love, solidarity, regular business interactions, or some other type of social commitment. Interpersonal ...
Relations of production - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/relations_of_production
By "relations of production", Marx and Engels meant the sum total of social relationships that people must enter into in order to survive, to produce, and to reproduce their means of life. As people must enter into these social relationships , i.e. because participation in them is not voluntary, the totality of these relationships ...
Interpersonal relationship - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/interpersonal_relationship
A power structure describes power and dominance relationships in a larger society. For example, a feudal society under a monarchy exhibits a strong dominance hierarchy in both economics and physical power, whereas dominance relationships in a society with democracy and capitalism are more complicated.
Primary and secondary groups - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/primary_and_secondary_groups
A primary group is typically a small social group (small-scale society) whose members share close, personal, enduring relationships. These groups are marked by members' concern for one another, in shared activities and culture. Examples include family, childhood friends, and highly influential social groups. The concept ...
Society - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/society
A society is a group of people involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Societies are characterized by patterns of relationships (social relations) between individuals who ...
Social alienation - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/social_alienation
Simmel's The Philosophy of Money describes how relationships become more and more mediated by money. Tönnies' Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft ( Community and Society) is about the loss of primary relationships such as familial bonds in favour of goal-oriented, secondary relationships. This idea of alienation can be ...
Portal:Society - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/portal:society
A human society is a group of people related to each other through continued relations, or a large social grouping sharing the same geographical or virtual territory, same interests, subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Human societies are characterized by patterns of relationships (social ...
Joking relationship - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/joking_relationship
In anthropology, a joking relationship is a relationship between two people that involves a ritualised banter of teasing or mocking. Contents. [hide]. 1 Structure; 2 Extent; 3 Antithesis; 4 Sources; 5 Further reading; 6 External links. Structure[edit]. Analysed by British social anthropologist Alfred Radcliffe-Brown in 1940, ...
Human bonding - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/human_bonding
Human bonding is the process of development of a close, interpersonal relationship between two or more people. It most commonly takes place between family members or friends, but can also develop among groups, such as sporting teams and whenever people spend time together. Bonding is a mutual, interactive ...
Dunbar's number - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/dunbar%27s_number
Dunbar's number is a suggested cognitive limit to the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships—relationships in which an individual knows who each person is and how each person relates to every other person. This number was first proposed in the 1990s by British anthropologist Robin ...
Network society - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/network_society
Van Dijk has defined the idea "network society" as a form of society increasingly organizing its relationships in media networks gradually replacing or complementing the social networks of face-to-face communication. Personal and social-network communication is supported by digital technology. This means that social and ...
Kinship - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/kinship
In anthropology, kinship is the web of social relationships that form an important part of the lives of all humans in all societies, although its exact meanings even within this discipline are often debated. Anthropologist Robin Fox states that "the study of kinship is the study of what man does with these basic facts of life – mating ...
Open relationship - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/open_relationship
An open relationship is an intimate relationship which is consensually non- monogamous. This term may sometimes refer to polyamory, but it is often used to signify a primary emotional and intimate relationship between two partners who agree to have sexual relationships but not romantic relationships with other people.
Monogamy - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/monogamy
Although the incidence of genetic monogamy may vary from 70% to 99% in different cultures or social environments, a large percentage of couples remain genetically monogamous during their relationships. A review paper, surveying 67 other studies, reported rates of extrapair paternity, in different societies, ranging from ...

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