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Law court (ancient Athens) - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/law_court_(ancient_athens)
This was meant to make the system much fairer to the poorer members of society, who had previously been excluded in favour of the elitist aristocrats. The archons who convened the courts had a purely administrative function and gave no legal direction or advice to the jurors: there was no judge but the jurors themselves.
Dunedin Law Courts - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/dunedin_law_courts
The Dunedin Law Courts is a notable historic building in central Dunedin in the South Island of New Zealand. They are located at the corner of Lower Stuart Street and Anzac Square, directly opposite the city's historic railway station. Contents. [hide]. 1 Architecture; 2 Historic precinct; 3 References; 4 External links  ...
Law Society of England and Wales - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/law_society_of_england_and_wal...
The Law Society of England and Wales (officially The Law Society) is the professional association that represents and governs the lawyers' profession for the jurisdiction of England and Wales. It provides services and support to practising and training lawyers as well as serving as a sounding board for law reform. Members ...
Court - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/court
A court is a tribunal, often as a government institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes between parties and carry out the administration of justice in civil, criminal, and administrative matters in accordance with the rule of law. In both common law and civil law legal systems, courts are the central means for ...
Society of Solicitors in the Supreme Courts of Scotland - ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/society_of_solicitors_in_the_s...
The Society of Solicitors in the Supreme Courts of Scotland, (SSC Society), was founded in 1784 and incorporated by Royal Charter has, and continues to play a central role in the life and work of the Courts of Scotland and the legal profession generally. For over 200 years, it has represented the interests of its members and  ...
Ancient Greek law - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ancient_greek_law
Along with the official enforcement of the law in the courts in the Grecian states, justice and social cohesion were collectively enforced by society at large. with informal collective justice often being targeted at elite offenders.
Legal history - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/legal_history
Twentieth century historians have viewed legal history in a more contextualised manner more in line with the thinking of social historians. They have looked at legal institutions as complex systems of rules, players and symbols and have seen these elements interact with society to change, adapt, resist or promote certain ...
Judiciary - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/judiciary
The judiciary is the system of courts that interprets and applies the law in the name of the state. The judiciary also provides a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the judiciary generally does not make statutory law (which is the responsibility of the legislature) or enforce ...
Traditional courts in Malawi - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/traditional_courts_in_malawi
Customary African law has been typified by as more concerned with the resolution of disputes than the punishment of crimes. Many systems of customary African law have little recognition of crimes, in the sense of a specific offence committed against, and prosecuted by, a society as ...
Bar (law) - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/bar_(law)
In the USA, Europe and many other countries referring to the law traditions of Europe, the area in front of the barrage is restricted to participants in the trial: the judge or judges, other court officials, the jury (if any), the lawyers for each party, the parties to the case, and witnesses giving testimony. The area behind the bar is ...
Equity (law) - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/equity_(law)
In jurisdictions following the English common law system, equity refers to the body of law which was developed in the English Court of Chancery and which is now administered concurrently with the common law. For much of its history, the English common law was principally developed and administered in the central royal ...
Rights of audience - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/rights_of_audience
Solicitors' clerks have also traditionally been allowed to be heard in proceedings in chambers in the High Court, such as summonses for directions (now known as case management hearings), and subsequent changes have preserved these rights, as explained by District Judge Robert Hill in an article in the Law Society's  ...
Roman law - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/roman_law
Traditionally, the origins of Roman legal science are connected to Gnaeus Flavius. Flavius is said to have published around the year 300 BC the formularies containing the words which had to be spoken in court to begin a legal action. Before the time of Flavius, these formularies are said to have been secret and known only ...
Inns of Court - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/inns_of_court
The Inns of Court in London are the professional associations for barristers in England and Wales. All barristers must belong to one such association. They have supervisory and disciplinary functions over their members. The Inns also provide libraries, dining facilities and professional accommodation. Each also has a ...
Criminal justice - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/criminal_justice
These codified laws may coexist with or contradict other forms of social control, such as religious proscriptions, professional rules and ethics, or the cultural mores and customs of a society. Within the realm of codified law, there are generally two forms of law that the courts are concerned with. Civil laws are rules and ...

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